The first words you'll see in our pilot.

The first words you'll see in our pilot.

What do you do when the title screen on a new game loads up? Some games make us impatient; the preceding logos have barely disappeared before we hammer the start button, eager to begin our adventure (or race/puzzle/mass-genocide, depends what you're playing...)

Other games invite us to linger. I remember the first time I played The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time; the site of Link riding Epona around Hyrule field, with the logo slowly burning into vision. I didn't give in to my impatience. Instead I sat there, taking in the visuals and that unforgettable music. I knew I couldn't wait to start my adventure with Link (my first adventure with Link, no less) but part of me didn't want that moment to end.

That feeling has come back to me in recent times.

The handsome and not so handsome face of Bit Socket. Let us know which one's which.

A few months ago, we wrote a blog post on the Bit Socket Facebook page. We said we were taking some time out from our Youtube videos to develop a television pilot. Our intentions were to take a month, maybe two, to make what we thought was the best example of how video games should be presented on television. Well, we did that, and we made something we're very proud of.

Our "challenge" for the first episode. There's a lot of laughter. It's very unprofessional.

Our "challenge" for the first episode. There's a lot of laughter. It's very unprofessional.

For a while, the excitement around us was easy to get caught up in. We thought we were unstoppable, and the people we needed to impress with our pilot gave us some excellent reviews. We made something we believed was the future of video games television; enjoyable by all (seriously, very few TV execs have played anything since Super Mario Bros., and even then...) but never shying from the love and enthusiasm for games that we put into our Youtube videos. But we ran into some problems.

I've always considered myself at my best when I'm making stuff. I'm happiest when I'm filming or editing another video of me and Scott raving on about the latest Yakuza game. I also think that over the years we've gotten pretty good at it; at making stuff. I've never been very good at selling stuff though.

To make a television series, you need money, and for a niche interest like video games, money is hard to come by. For a few months now, behind the scenes, various prospective sponsors have been pitched with Bit Socket, and lots of people have been trying very hard for us to get our show made, but understandably it's been a hard sell. We are unbelievably thankful to the support we have received from those that have seen the pilot so far. I have to admit though, I haven't a clue how to raise funds to make a show; all I know is how to make the show with what I'm given.

The Bit Socket pilot is all about being inclusive; we talk about old and new games, things that everyone can enjoy, like Tearaway here.

The Bit Socket pilot is all about being inclusive; we talk about old and new games, things that everyone can enjoy, like Tearaway here.

So for the past few months, we've been wondering what to do next. Do we go back to what we used to do and put the TV series to the back of our minds until it comes to pass, if it ever does? Do we give up on Youtube and put all our efforts into making the TV series happen?

I've been staring at that screen, prompting me to press start, and I haven't had the heart to press anything.

I think we're ready to do it now though. We want you to be able to see what it was that we made all those months ago. In the background, this pilot has been shown to people that have the money to decide the fate of the show; the "people that matter". In reality though, the people that matter are you, the ones who've watched us all along, who wished us good luck with the pilot, who've been waiting for months now to see what we're going to do next.

So we're pressing start. Tomorrow morning, we'll make the pilot a public video on youtube. You'll get to see what our vision of a video games TV show should be like. You'll get to decide for yourself if it's any good, and you'll be able to tell us so.

Jack McHard and Kurt Hunter, the Game Cops, in their first adventure cleaning the streets of Game Town. We've actually been dying to show you Game Cops. It's going to be its own feature soon, we think, if folk like it.

Jack McHard and Kurt Hunter, the Game Cops, in their first adventure cleaning the streets of Game Town. We've actually been dying to show you Game Cops. It's going to be its own feature soon, we think, if folk like it.

As for what's next, well, you're reading this on our brand new website. We have a new blog, a podcast that we'd love you to listen to (we have a great time making it!) and, of course, our youtube channel, which we've started making videos for again. Basically, we're back, and we couldn't be happier to be back.

When the pilot goes live, if you like it, please share it and let others know about it. We're still looking for ways to get a series made, so as many people that see it, the better. Maybe that way we can find the funding or the right way to develop it. Or maybe we don't need the funding. Maybe, if you like the pilot a lot, we could just make full episodes monthly for Youtube.

Like Link at the beginning of Ocarina of Time, we've just been placed in a brand new world, and we're free to experiment and do what we like in it.

It's an exciting time for us, and we hope we can make stuff that you like too.

Keep Bit Socketin'

- Joe

Everybody Loves Metal Gear Raymond